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UPCOMING HOUSTON CHAPTER EVENTS

The Houston Chapter meets on the second Tuesday of every month unless otherwise specified. For events where alcohol is served, please see our alcohol policy on our policies page. 

Upcoming events

    • November 08, 2021
    • 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    • Online - Register for Teams Link
    Register

    The Hydrographic Society of America - Houston, Texas Chapter's November Technical Meeting

    The Hydrographic Society of America - Houston Chapter's November Technical Meeting. Please keep in mind that daylight savings time in the US ends this year on Sunday, November 7th. This talk will occur at 2PM Central Standard Time on Monday, November 8th.

    Location: Online - Register for meeting link


    Speaker : Chris Lowery - University of Texas at Austin

    Title: Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Training at the University of Texas, Austin

    Additional Info: The UT Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course is a unique hands-on training opportunity for students in marine geophysical techniques for collecting, interpreting, and integrating multibeam, seismic, and sedimentological data. This talk will summarize the teaching philosophy of the course and its benefits to students and industry.

    About the Speaker: Chris is a paleoceanographer who uses planktic and benthic foraminifera, as well as geochemistry, sedimentology, and geophysical data to understand how ancient marine life responded to changes in its environment in order to better understand ongoing human-driven disruptions. Ancient environmental and ecological changes can provide information about feedbacks and response times of natural systems which cannot be determined from the relatively short period of modern observations. Chris’s research is broadly focused on extinction and recovery, marine productivity, ocean circulation, and sea level rise. Intervals of interest include 1) Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events, 2) the end Cretaceous mass extinction and the subsequent recovery of life, 3) Paleogene climate and circulation change, and 4) Holocene sea level rise and storm events on the Texas Coast.